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Postby capt_tightpants » Sun Nov 27, 2005 10:13 pm

Magus wrote:2) Nothing can be one-dimensional. Even the tiniest, most negligible dot has at least two dimensions, length and width.


Except for a dot perhaps?
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Postby capt_tightpants » Sun Nov 27, 2005 10:19 pm

I'd like to point out that LOTR has simple charectors for the same reason that Animal Farm does, because it's an allegory(thank you highschool English).
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Postby aldan » Sun Nov 27, 2005 11:37 pm

Is that at all related to a crocodile?
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Postby capt_tightpants » Mon Nov 28, 2005 4:15 pm

Umm...Yes :scratch:
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Postby Magus » Mon Nov 28, 2005 5:40 pm

While I agree that The Lord of the Rings is allegorical, I don't believe it's a direct allegory, nor one nearly so strict as Animal Farm, to use your example.

And I'm not sure what you mean in your posts addressing mine. What I said was factual in both cases.
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Postby capt_tightpants » Mon Nov 28, 2005 7:05 pm

The Lord of the Rings may not be directly allegorical, but as long as the charectors are symbolical it's easy to see why the story can be effective without having multi-faceted charectors.

What you wrote:
About The Lord of the Rings being one of the best selling Fantasy books of all time. It is THE best selling book of all time, second only to the Bible.

What I read:
The Lord of the Rings is one of the best selling Fantasy books of all time, second only to the Bible.

I thought it was funny.

And by dot I meant point, which geometrically speaking does not have a length or width(thank you highschool geometry).
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Postby aldan » Tue Nov 29, 2005 1:29 am

My points tend to have plenty of length, though not much depth to speak of...

As for the allegory of the LotR, it's pretty obvious that he was reliving the first and second world wars through this fantasy novel (it originally was to be one book, but the publisher thought that it was too long so they decided to break it into three parts and sell it that way). It becomes even more obvious when you get to Minas Tirith and the back to the Shire at the end, where the hobbits find that the safe haven they left behind had become harshly changed and damaged while they were gone. Professor Tolkien served during the first war, and then was in GBR during the second, so he saw both sides of the experience, and I think that it's pretty well expressed, via his allegorical story, what his feelings were in living through the horrors of war.
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Postby Magus » Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:16 pm

Tolkien vehemently denied any connection with The Lord off the Rings and World War II, although he does admit to the influence of the First World War.

And as for the part about the Shire, the sources I've accessed on the matter place The Shire as symbolic of his home town of Hogs Head. And the scourging of the Shire is symbolic for the effects of the industrial revolution, which Tolkien himself grew up during; watching the city and technology forever looming over his home and encroaching upon his own haven.

Although I suppose different scholars have different views.
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Postby capt_tightpants » Tue Nov 29, 2005 5:43 pm

Hey, isn't there a Hogs Head somewhere in Harry Potter?
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Postby Magus » Tue Nov 29, 2005 5:44 pm

No. There is, however, a Hogsmead.
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Postby capt_tightpants » Tue Nov 29, 2005 5:45 pm

Uh-oh, I just mentioned Harry Potter in direct connention with JRR Tolkien, I'm pretty sure that warrants a smiting.
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Postby Magus » Tue Nov 29, 2005 5:50 pm

No, there's plenty of The Lord of the Rings that J.K. Rowling drew upon in writing her Harry Potter series. Dumbledor is heavily influenced by Gandalf and Voldemort drew upon Sauron. That much is obvious from the texts.
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