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Dipping Into the Character Well

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Postby aldan » Wed Nov 30, 2005 1:17 am

Ahhhh... but would she ever admit to it??
"It is better to keep your mouth shut and to appear stupid than
to open it and remove all doubt."
---Mark Twain
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Postby Magus » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:04 pm

I think I read somewhere that she did... maybe not to that specific degree, but if I recall I think that she did admit that Dumbledor, at least, was inspired by Gandalf. I haven't heard her admit to anything about Voldemort.
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Postby capt_tightpants » Wed Nov 30, 2005 9:50 pm

Yeah there was a bar in Hogsmead named Hogshead.
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Postby capt_tightpants » Wed Nov 30, 2005 9:51 pm

It was the shadier place.
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Postby Magus » Thu Dec 01, 2005 4:18 pm

My mistake then.
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Postby berry » Thu Dec 08, 2005 10:31 am

I thought LTOR was a comment on agriculture and belief in our ties to nature versus industrialisation and capatilism. I thought the characters reflected the struggle between those ideals.
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Postby Magus » Thu Dec 08, 2005 4:10 pm

That was actually a driving force behind it.

But I think that it's greatest success is that there are so many different interpretations to it. Anybody can insert nearly anything of controversy and struggle in their time and that is what Lord of the Rings can symbolize. It's so wonderfully universal and that's its truest beauty.
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Postby berry » Mon Dec 12, 2005 1:29 pm

ain't that the truth!
Outside of a dog, a book is mans best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.
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Re: Dipping Into the Character Well

Postby lovesaphira » Fri Mar 27, 2009 12:36 am

Ah i LOVE my characters *hugs characters*

I always thought my strong point in writin was coming up with the characters. Often i find myself writing about a character and a random idea just springs into my head so i write taht down and it becomes part of my character. Pretty much all my characters have a character profile. Even my supporting charcters. lol. Not the ones that are in the story for a total of two paragraphs but hte ones that pop in every now and again. And some of my supporting characters even end up having central roles by the end of the series.
But i love coming up with backgrounds and stuff for my charcters. it's so much fun. If my story is ever published and if it actually does well i may write a sort of spin-off series about where my characters came from.
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Re: Dipping Into the Character Well

Postby Grand Evander » Fri Mar 27, 2009 9:19 am

Something to consider, lovesaphira, is whether or not you have interlocked the backstories of the characters. They may have known each other, loved/hated each other, or shared some common experience that reshaped their lives that they no longer talk about. This leads to occasional side glances and changes in language/tone whenever they are in the same room together. Such interweaving, in my opinion, can provide a very effective mode of plot development.

When I plan out my story, I like to think of myself as starting somewhere in the middle. My characters, their struggles, and the world they live in didn't appear out of thin air. The story starts at a point optimal for telling it, but telling the story involves going both backwards and forwards. The characters progress by learning about themselves and coming to terms with aspects of their common past their journey unearths.

I think it's great you've planned out your characters in such detail. I seem to lack that ability but have occasional insight into the people I create that helps me fumble through my storytelling.

Submitted for your review,

GE
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Re: Dipping Into the Character Well

Postby Talon Sinnah » Fri Mar 27, 2009 4:01 pm

i agree with GE that is wanderful that you do that. It is actually something I fall short on in some aspects. I have major character backgrounds but supporting characters I do not really ful with som much. This may actually give my story a bit more foundation and the characters a little more personality which I think they really need.
I am the poet of the body and I am the poet of the Soul. The pleasures of heaven are with me and the pains of hell are with me. The first I graft and increase upon myself, the latter I translate into a new tongue.

-Walt Whitman-
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Re: Dipping Into the Character Well

Postby Grand Evander » Fri Mar 27, 2009 5:32 pm

I came to a realization that I needed to develop my minor characters more (if not in the writing directly than at least conceptually for me) when I found myself revisiting scenes and concluding such characters were both unrealistic and uninteresting. As a rule of thumb, I now go back and delete plot-driving dialogue with these characters in favor of character-driving dialogue. When I think back to my favorite stories, what I remember most are the inconsequential conversations between people with emotions and uncertainty.

I think writers need to see the past, present, and future simultaneously. We have to know where all our characters have been, where they are, and at least a vague idea of where they're going to begin to even talk about them.


Quite a daunting task indeed!
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