Robbin Hobb, Ships and Fools

Review books and discuss your favorite authors.

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ScottSF
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Post by ScottSF »

Finnished all the Tawny Man books! It was much more fun having read the liveship books first, and of course Farseers before that. My favorite was the second book in Tawny man because of its relation to liveships. I find them all to be engaging books, I like the addition of swift and Nettle to the story. Only thing I didn't like was the very end. I was thinking about the hedge witch's prediction and I thought she was talking about someone else, in other words I thought things would turn out different with the fool but I'm still talking in circles too keep from spoiling part of the story for lady flame. And there was two questions that I did not get answered. One of them had to do with Fitz's birth mother. I seem to remember something of a mystery with a change meeting with a mountain kingdom person in the market when Fitz was a kid in the first book. I will certainly miss the farseer world of Ms. Hobb choosing not to write stories there anymore. I would love another bingtown book. Oh welly, got plenty more authors to catch up on , i.e. Erickson, Martin, Meany and Jordan.
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Post by Lady Envy »

Read all nine books,I honestly didn't work out Amber till I read Golden Fool,Liveship Traders was my favorite out of the three trilogies.
If you pick up Shaman's Crossing expecting it to be like her other books than you will be disappointed,its slower paced and nothing really happens till near the end.Its set in a world very similar to the Old West,and a lot of the book is taking up with the main character's inner turmoil.
hiding under a bush

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Post by GOLLUM »

I'm afraid I'm not much of a Hobb fan. To me she is a bit overrated when compared to writers of the calibre of Gene wolfe, M John Harrison, Italo Calvino, GRRM, Steven Erikson, China Mieville etc...

I don't mind the books but never found them all that satisfying.
Even the smallest person can make a diference.

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Benjaru
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Post by Benjaru »

Ah, a gore-thriver eh?
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Tremayne
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Post by Tremayne »

So we can talk about the ending now? I was totally disappointed and immediately got on amazon to see what others said about the book and found a lot of controversy among the comments.

I still haven't read the middle trilogy and have just now begun thinking about tackling them, but I don't mind others talking about them.

Assassin's Quest is the slowest of her books that I've read thus far. I really think she could have edited it to be half the length, lost nothing and given a more pleasant read. I would even recommend anyone reading it and getting frustrated just skip to Ch. 20 Jhaampe and read from there.

Thanks for the heads up on her new book being completely different.

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ScottSF
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Post by ScottSF »

I would agree that book 3 of the Farseer trilogy doesn't seem to match the quality of her other stuff. I found myself pretty restless reading it. I guess I was more interested in what was going on with the redships than I was with the mystery of the elderlings. Plus the stone dragons were just odd. Later I appreciated the idea of the stone dragons so I guess something with the delivery was just a bit frustrating because I liked many of the plot elements that happened in that book. Like with Nettle and Dutiful, plus the link he shares with the fool. The stuff becomes vital for the plots in the Tawny man trilogy. So the momentum of the other books carried me thought it. I would be happy if she wrote more books in that world. I don't need to hear about Fitz as a main character anymore but some of the others might make interesting stories. I definitly would like more bingtown related stories. Or better, stories of some other region on the map that isn't so far from Bingtown and the 6 Duchies so that can have contact with familiar elements from the Elderling books but still be fresh and new. Or! something that features the fool and the Black Man in wherever it is that they came from.... yeah
Time flies like an Arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.
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Karoline
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Post by Karoline »

Hi!

I have just finished the Farseer Trilogy and I really liked it, so I was wondering if anyone think I should read the Liveship Traders Trilogy before I read the Tawny Man Trilogy?
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ScottSF
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Post by ScottSF »

Definitely! :) If you go back to the beginning of the post you'll see I got several chapters into tawny man and then realized that I wanted to read liveships first. The stories aren't directly related but they are related enough to make it more fun to read Tawny Man onces you have read liveships. You'll have to start over with new characters but trust me half way through the first liveship book, you will be hooked.
Time flies like an Arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.
-Groucho Marx

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Karoline
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Post by Karoline »

Thanks!

I will do that, just have to finish the Magician by Robert E. Feist first. Then I'll go strait to the book store and by it!! :D
There is no mistaking a real book when one meets it. It is like falling in love.

Christopher Morley (1890 - 1957)

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