D&D : How to get PC's together for the first time.

Sci-Fi and Fantasy games are some of the most popular on the market. Drop in to talk about your favorites from video games to role playing games.

Moderator: Bmat

User avatar
Dr_Love
True Visionary
True Visionary
Posts: 1555
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2005 7:49 am
Location: United States
Contact:

Post by Dr_Love »

Well i don't think did anything to the DM that time, just he decided he should do something to make it funny....:| geeze.
"They are a curious thing, these emotions. How they fly in the face of logic, how they overrule the most basic instincts. Because, in the measure of time, in the measure of humanity, we sense those self-indulgent instincts to be a weakness, we sense that the needs of the community must outweight the desires of the one. Only when we admit to our failures and recognize our weaknesses can we rise above them. Together." -Drizzt Do'Urden

User avatar
Qray
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 8152
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 12:15 pm
Location: Down in Cognito
Contact:

Post by Qray »

University
All the PC's are students or otherwise associated with a University/School.

For graduation/readiness test, a teacher/Master/Alumni needs the characters to go on a mission.

This type of start, or rather having the University in the equation, offers a few useful elements to a game. A base of operations (why have a keep, or lands when you have the University,) a constant stream of missions (people keep coming to the University for help,) and the aid of more skilled/powerful NPC's (teachers or University Alums) as the mission requires

Again, the one problem is that it limits the players options to starting out. Some may not want to run characters under the constant tutelage of those in a University.

User avatar
aldan
Artisan Wordsmith
Artisan Wordsmith
Posts: 3886
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:46 am
Location: Ohio, right now...
Contact:

Post by aldan »

One thing that I might suggest is to try having all of the players write down a basic background for their character BUT not include any city names. That way, if the DM wants to start them as former slaves, he/she can do so, but if the DM just wants to place them in a specific area of the world the campaign's located in, that can be done as well.
"It is better to keep your mouth shut and to appear stupid than
to open it and remove all doubt."
---Mark Twain

User avatar
who me
Resident Author
Resident Author
Posts: 5561
Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2005 6:32 am
Location: Earth mostly

Post by who me »

in my games often the characters are not the classic fighter wizard Player characters but towns people,
and then they become adventurers over time.

often something happens in the town they live,
and then the butcher, the black smith, the wood cutter, and the local monk decide to sort it out.

works very nicely.
right now we have a ships cook, he cooks up a good meal, and is not one to cross in a fight.

another way I bring characters together is not all at once but over time.
perhaps two fighter characters are traveling, they then come across a traveling monk the three then stop in a cave because of a storm, the cave is a tomb (dungeon crawl adventure) there they rescue a gnome (the next player character) and so the player characters come and go.

User avatar
Qray
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 8152
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 12:15 pm
Location: Down in Cognito
Contact:

Post by Qray »

Subtle. ;-p

I swear I'm working on it!
I'm going to die the way I've lived...poor, screaming, and naked.

User avatar
aldan
Artisan Wordsmith
Artisan Wordsmith
Posts: 3886
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:46 am
Location: Ohio, right now...
Contact:

Post by aldan »

First Edition AD&D actually came up with an adventure in which the characters start out as, well, people on a slave ship. None are members of a character class, and none have any normal adventuring equipment with them (they're slaves). They shipwreck on an island and have to find a way off. The characters then have to escape the surviving crew members, the creatures on the island, explore said island and then find a way to escape it. Interesting, though it does take some of the things like learning to study magic and really abbreviates them....
"It is better to keep your mouth shut and to appear stupid than
to open it and remove all doubt."
---Mark Twain

User avatar
Talon Sinnah
Artisan Wordsmith
Artisan Wordsmith
Posts: 3842
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:43 pm

Post by Talon Sinnah »

Yeap and most of the people I play with would be really mad at that but hey I may use it sometime.
I am the poet of the body and I am the poet of the Soul. The pleasures of heaven are with me and the pains of hell are with me. The first I graft and increase upon myself, the latter I translate into a new tongue.

-Walt Whitman-

User avatar
aldan
Artisan Wordsmith
Artisan Wordsmith
Posts: 3886
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:46 am
Location: Ohio, right now...
Contact:

Post by aldan »

I'm figuring that the true training can be done when the characters increase in level of ability. For fighters, it actually makes a lot of sense to me. For thieves, they'd definitely need to get hooked up with a more experienced rogue to help to teach them the more difficult-to-learn rudiments of the 'trade'. For Priests, they'd need to take a lot of time to really learn the religion that they have been 'selected' for. Wizards would need to learn to read magic (the scroll/scrolls found during the adventure either were specially created by a wizard for use by apprentices when they first gain their first level (are now officially Wizards) to be able to copy them into their Tomes if they don't yet know the Read Magic spell) and would also need to learn more about spell research, spell components, any guilds of mages, the laws regarding magic use in whatever culture they are a part of, and other such things. At least a part of that would require the help of an experienced mage, though much would be easy enough to track down in various places as time goes on.

Now, please note that I did not speak of any of the specialist classes, even though they were used (at least the Ranger, Paladin, Illusionist, Druid and Bard were) in 1st Ed. AD&D. Why?

Well, some of them like the Ranger and Druid, would be tied sharply with the character's pre-history (they grew up children of wilderness dwellers, or near an area that was very wild and was being damaged by the nearby inhabitants, and it angered the character(s).

The Paladin would be similar to how the Cleric was 'selected' by the god he/she came to worship.

The Illusionist would be a bit tougher if using 1st Ed, though the later editions of the game, where they got rid of the special language that only Illusionists used for their magic, it would be simple enough to do, because it'd then be simply another thing where character background would relate to the chosen specialist wizard class chosen.

The Bard is the only one that I can't quite figure out. First Edition had the Bard only available after the character had first been a Fighter, then other classes, and then had to be trained by a very high level Druid to be able to become a Bard. It was very complicated, and wouldn't have been able to be used in that situation, since the character would be very powerful compared to any other creature on the island, and so it'd unbalance it. Second and Third Ed, again, would simplify it to an extent, but it would require that the character already pretty much BE a Bard before the start of the first adventure, because they'd need to have selected an instrument that they'd play, and have been trained to play music on it. I've never met a person that picks up a musical instrument for the first time ever and was able to immediately begin to play songs on it, and I can't really think of a brilliant magical way to accomplish it, without the character finding a magical instrument that is able to psionically guide him/her in playing songs on it. *shrugs*

Maybe one of you'll come up with a better idea than that, but it's all I've been able to come up with....
"It is better to keep your mouth shut and to appear stupid than
to open it and remove all doubt."
---Mark Twain

Post Reply