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Ariel
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Post by Ariel »

But aldan, if one takes an interest in the author after getting one of his book second hand, he will then buy the newer ones in the regular store. :wink:

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Dark Knight
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Post by Dark Knight »

yeah but have you seen the prices of new books.... :shock:

much cheaper to go second hand.....

or to the library.....

Well, sorry Gary but I have not read any GemQuest books....and I don't have any ether....

I don't plan to buy anymore books apart from the next HP book...

I don't get much reading done at the moment... if I ever do get back into it to any degree, I plan to try to read the 150 plus books I already have that I have not read yet....

Once I get that down then I might buy some more or go to the library....

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Post by Qray »

I agree, used bookstores in general have a good vibe. If for no other reason you can tell they're usually not in it for the money, but for the love of the written word.

Anywho, I also agree about used books over new. I don't buy strictly used books, but if I can find a used one in good condition, I'll buy it over a new one. Apologies to Gary and the other published writers out there, but my momma didn't raise no fool (yes, yes, I know...double negative. BMLYKM. ;-])

And to echo Ariel's comments, I own dozens of books by Asimov. The first of his books I read in the library and the first of his that I owned, I bought used. The majority of his works that I bought however, were new. These were bought after I'd read some of his books in the library and bought some used ones and got interested in his writing.
I'm going to die the way I've lived...poor, screaming, and naked.

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who me
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Post by who me »

I like antique books, first printings and autographed books.
when i was in school in Florida we read huckleberry Finn. everyone read the version in there text book.
yeas ago my grandmother gave me a very old copy of Huckleberry Finn. the school book version was shorter and quite different.
what really upset me was that the teacher wanted me to read the school book version so i could answer the test questions correctly.
so having the big mouth that i do I said I would prefer to read the mark twain version so that i could understand the book.

till you brought it up i never thought about the fact that the author does not get any money for the sale of a used book. obvious really.

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Post by Ariel »

I have an antique book by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

I have some beautiful hard-cover books on herbs that would've cost almost 30 bucks and got them for like 5.00! Same with my bird and flower books.

New books are indeed expensive. Sad but true.

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Post by who me »

i would like to know why they are (have become) so expensive.
hint,perhaps one of our resident authors would know?

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Post by Gary Wassner »

Yes, Colton's role becomes more and more important as things progress, or digress, or regress...however you look at it.
The fabric weaves of its own will...

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Post by Gary Wassner »

Why are books so expensive today? why are movies so expensive? And gasoline?

Honestly, it costs so much today to bring a book to the shelf. And the system that governs book sales makes it so hard for publishers to produce more cheaply. All books that don't sell in a 60 day period are subject to returns to the publisher. And what is the publisher going to do with the remainders? Rip off the covers and sell them in Mexico? They lose money on most of their authors. A few of the big names fuel all the others. Just think about how many books are on the shelves at B & N or Borders. Most of them don't sell 5000 copies. Yet the author has been given an advance, the editors have been paid, the printer and cover artist etc etc have all been paid. It's a risky business and a costly one. POD (Print on demand) should change some of the economics of the industry, but so far only marginal authors are published by POD houses.
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Post by LightBrigade »

Gary Wassner wrote:Why are books so expensive today? why are movies so expensive? And gasoline?

Honestly, ... so far only marginal authors are published by POD houses.


After the diligent and in depth analysis of the first point above, one is urged to look forward to a similarly insightful point of view regarding the second and third question, films and gasoline.

Then I sincerely hope I won't be reduced to tears on behalf of film makers and gasoline company owners in the fashion I have already been lamenting over the poor economic fate of the amiable class of publishers.
When people agree with me, I always feel that I must be wrong. -- Oscar Wilde --

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Post by Gary Wassner »

Don't need an in depth answer here: Corporate profit. Simple. The major oil companies and the major entertainment companies control the pricing to an extent. But it really isn't simple at all. We want to drive, we don't seem to care about the fact that we're vulnerable to global issues. Oil is a limited comodity. Movies on the other hand get more and more expensive to make, hence more and more costly to see. For each blockbuster, there are 25 failures. at least. and the public wants blockbusters, so the stakes go up and up. In many respects, it 's similar to the publishing industry. Only a few major successes fuel the profits, and those few like HP allow for the countless midlist authors and others.
The fabric weaves of its own will...

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Part A

Post by LightBrigade »

The marginal activity in Publishing On Demand proves again that as in the case of loans and gadgets, the author is turned into a consumer urged by the archetypal need of social recognition as an individual who is not known for any other merit of character, and thus prompted to spend towards it on the grounds of low affordability – allegedly and only at first sight.

The author in POD becomes another consumer. To buy recognition…

Or is it publicity? The answer is obvious when the author is to actually promote and to a large extent distribute their work then.

Unless some author thinks I will ever possibly come to know them, simply because they are merely included in the Selling Houses lists (to avoid naming). How many of those listed there are known to the reader now?

In POD the Publisher is the printer doing part of the logistics and the ad boy for a couple of posters, part of which cost, if not whole, the author pays for _anyway_.

“The plan” is a further consumer-friendly kind of vanity press.
When people agree with me, I always feel that I must be wrong. -- Oscar Wilde --

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Part B

Post by LightBrigade »

If corporate profit is the cause for high prices in the film-making and energy fuel industry, could the same be also valid for the publishing industry?

Unless this industry section is angelic.

If genuine talent generated revenue, fake and imposed consuming needs en masse driving to debt would be an unnecessary practice – Advertising is the only sector of Industry where genuine talent is nowadays of any use.

The Martini Advertisement would not use George Clooney (genuine talent) and wars (for lack of talent) in far, expendable parts of the globe would not be necessary in order to augment the target margins of the Construction and WMD sectors corporate profit.
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Anyway, common sense is aware when anyone comes forth to dictate what people need to know in depth.
When people agree with me, I always feel that I must be wrong. -- Oscar Wilde --

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