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Ever felt like just giving up?

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Ever felt like just giving up?

Postby Manji » Wed Apr 20, 2005 5:20 am

Ever felt like just giving up on the whole writin gig? Right now, I have the will and urge to write but whenever I start writing and when I'm done I'm unsatisfied with the whole thing.
It's not writers block. What the heck is it?
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Postby cleasterwood » Wed Apr 20, 2005 6:44 am

I think we all get that way at times. Remember you are your own worst critic. It's probably not as bad as you think it is. Just don't throw in the towel; keep at it and eventually you'll be satisfied with your writing. :)
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Postby Aslan » Wed Apr 20, 2005 8:36 am

Are you just unsatisfied with the final product? Or are you also having trouble enjoying the process of writing?

As long as you're enjoying the creation process, definitely keep at it. Sometimes I lose that, and then it's time to take a break.

As far as being unsatisfied with the product, that happens to ALL of us. All the time. I look at what I wrote and go, "ugh."
Posting on SV for input can help. Workshopping can help. Writing conferences. If you're in school, ask a teacher for help or take more writing classes. If you're not in school, sign up for writing classes! :) There are many ways to improve your skills.
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Re: Ever felt like just giving up?

Postby Tattered_rose » Wed Apr 20, 2005 1:35 pm

Manji wrote:Ever felt like just giving up on the whole writin gig? Right now, I have the will and urge to write but whenever I start writing and when I'm done I'm unsatisfied with the whole thing.
It's not writers block. What the heck is it?


It's you!! ::points::

Anyways, yeah, I have that feeling a lot...you just have to push past it. If you aren't satisfied with it, keep writing and change it until you are. And remember, not everything that you write will satisfy you.
But, as for a name for it? No idea.
And yeah, you just have to write anyways...there's not much that i wrote that I'm satisfied with...so yeah.
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Postby Magus » Wed Apr 20, 2005 3:06 pm

I agree with all of the above. try to work through your difficulties now. "It's always darkest before dawn", so don't give up even if it seems hopeless. For "Those who fear the dark have never seen what the light can do."
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Postby Anthentar » Wed Apr 20, 2005 6:00 pm

I agree. It will pass in time. Get someone else to read it over. It might not be as bad as you say it is. Get outside input and take it to heart when sitting down to revise.
"He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby become one. And if you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into you." - Beyond Good and Evil, aphorism 146
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Postby Neurolanis » Wed Apr 20, 2005 7:24 pm

All these coments are good. I agree with Aslan especially, and think that you should relax and just enjoy being creative. You don't have to show anyone what you write, and no one can critise it but you. I think if you let go you'll have fun, then it'll come back.
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Postby omnituton » Fri Apr 22, 2005 8:06 am

I think everyone thinks about throwing in the towel now and again.
But it seems to me unless your dependent upon writing for your living there is no need to take your bad patches so much to heart.

It also seems to me that most dedicated writers are their own worst critics - they're so fixated on realising the perfection of their vision on paper that the various approximations of it never satisfy.

It's always easier said than done of course (because if you feel the urge to write it - it MATTERS) but try to develop an attitude towards your own writing that accepts it as an approximation process.

Also remember, release yourself from the pressure of authorial control i.e. If YOU don't convey exactly the right message to your reader - so what. What has made some of the greatest books in the world great is that they are amenable to multiple interpretations and their authors keep their noses and opinions out of the way - letting the reader get on with the enjoyable business of finding their own meanings in the text.

Anyhow, thats how I try to get over the bad patches. But surprise, surprise they still occur...probably just a feature of the process

All the best

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Postby Aslan » Fri Apr 22, 2005 10:47 am

I agree with omnituton that we're our own worst critics. You may get some very positive feedback by sharing your work with your peers. I used to be on TV. I was always upset by my performances. They weren't good enough. I did such-and-such wrong. And so forth. But my peers, employers, and the audience all thought I was great. They never noticed my mistakes and snafus.

We're most self-critcal about the things that are most important to us.
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Postby Alaskamatt17 » Fri Apr 22, 2005 11:33 am

Everything looks terrible right after you finish. Sometimes it actually is (I know both books that I've written were horrendous in rough draft, one of them still is). If you've written a book it will probably start to sound a whole lot better around fourth or fifth draft, and from there you just need to skim through and fix little things. After the rough drsft of my current novel, I thought I'd never be able to get it in god enough shape to show to other people. But now, a year later, it's reading like a real, professional book. Every one of my beta readers has zipped through it in about three days (except Magus).

Editing really is the key to writing. Anything (well, almost anything) can be made good by a rigorous series of revisions.
After a certain high level of technical skill is achieved, science and art tend to coalesce in esthetics, plasticity, and form. The greatest scientists are always artists as well.
-Albert Einstein
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Postby tiriel » Fri Apr 22, 2005 11:55 am

I suggest not showing it to non-writers for advice. I also advise against showing them at all. Their response is almost always 'Yeah, that's really good,' which is infuriating because it's either good, like they say, or so bad that they feel too embarrassed to say otherwise. And they have no idea what good writing is.
Once I showed my friend a bit from the middle of a WIP i have, and he started spewing high school English at me like "not good character development," and "I don't understand whats going on," both of which were entirely understandable, due to the circumstances, but he maintained it was because I was just not good.
I have spent most of the day putting in a comma and the rest of the day taking it out.
— Oscar Wilde
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Postby Magus » Fri Apr 22, 2005 2:13 pm

Yes, rub it in that I haven't gotten to it yet. It's too much paper to print out and I'm trying to limit my actual time on the computer. And, as I understand it, it's no longer a current draft. So, once again, I apologize.

And, yes, we are our own worst critics. There's a reason for that. We have to be as writers. How else can we be expected to develop as writers when others find more at fault then we do?
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