Using a different medium?

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berry
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Using a different medium?

Post by berry »

I have recently revisted a story that i was finding very difficult and have been looking at different ways to make it work.
I was wondering if anyone else had though of turning one of thier stories into a graphic novel form?
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Magus
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Post by Magus »

This actually reminds me of something that a friend of mine and I were doing.

I got this great idea for a cultural satire (which is far from my usual fair in writing). It was just too enticing to pass up, but then I realized that pure text was not the medium that suited this best. Instead, I opted to got the comic-strip/graphic novel route for it.

One problem: while I might be an okay, servicable artist, I have no delusions about being good, let alone nearly as good as I would need to be for this kind of project. So I enlisted my friend Kristina to draw, and I write (although she contributes a great deal in terms of ideas and revisions for the writing as well).

So, to actually answer your question, yes, I'm going that route presently with a project of mine.

Although this isn't exactly your "graphic novel" question, I'm also experimenting on mixing he visual with the textual in other projects of mine. This one massively-massive poem of mine that I'm currently working on, "Wolf Rounds," ends with an image that is as integral to the poem itself as Blake's woodcarvings were of his own poetry. I'm also tinkering with this same idea in other projects of mine as well. The marriage of the visual and the textual is actually a matter of some interest for me.

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Post by RHFay »

The marriage of the visual and the textual is actually a matter of some interest for me.
Interesting. I have sent a few of my poems with accompanying artwork, with a bit of success. I've found that some poems work well with accompanying images, while others may not. There are some I feel should form the images alone, while others do benefit from an illustration.

Some editors have actually asked for illustrations after accepting poems. Then it's an instance of coming up with an appropriate visual to go with the text.

Hopefully, if all goes well, my forthcoming book of poetry will be a collection of verse and illustrations. There are a few poems among those that I have chosen that simply cry out for illustrations.

It's certainly not a graphic novel, but what Magus said about mixing the textual and visual sounded familiar.
"I'm going to do what the warriors of old did. I'm going to recite poetry!" Andrew of Armar.

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Post by Magus »

Good luck with that, RHFay! I hope it all goes well.

Yeah, Blake, especially as of late, is a literary figure of some interest to me. The Rossetti was a fantastic artist, but definitely was less of a poet than he was a visualist. I also read my brother's copy of the latest issue of Jubilat, and there was about 20 pages of this one guys poetry that looked like he hand-wrote it on the page, with some amusing illustrations intermixed among the words. It's definitely an aspect that I'd like to tinker with in some of my own writing (if only I could draw better than half-way decently).

There's this one girl in my Creative Writing class who wrote a poem called "Cassandra (Semper Fidelis)." She printed it out on the computer labs, which had extra-long paper. I thought that it would be excellent for her to get really brown, crinkled, wrinkled, old-looking paper, burn the edges slightly with a candle, roll it up like a scroll, wrap a silk crimson ribbon around it and fasten it with some wax (and a seal). It would have been an exquisite physical representation of the poem itself (another aspect of writing that's intrigued me more as of late).

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Post by berry »

I was thinking of using a series of newspaper articles and some basic comic layouts mixed with portions of text. I was unsure how I would pitch this to a publisher? However I do have to actually finish it first and see if any good so that's a moot point right now. I was thinking of The Watchmen, I liked the fact that so much story could be fitted in with the mix of styles.
Outside of a dog, a book is mans best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.
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Post by RoberII »

Personally, I have been involved with a few projects like this. Unfortunately, larger projects are often difficult on an amateur basis due to time constraints. The three projects I have been involved in failed because of college exams, unexpected events.. One artist from Finland even had to join the army.

My suggestion, if anyone wants to get collaborate with an artist on a comic-book format, is to get a few short stories under your belt before you take on larger projects. This way, you will also be able to find better artists willing to spend their time on you. Deviantart.com has a forum dedicated to the cross-breeding of visual artists and writers, and you can find a lot of good artists there, as well as throngs of not so good artists. Once you have made a few projects there, it should not be impossible to find truly amazing artists outside of that forum.

Also, familiarize yourself with comic book manuscripts, and study comic books. Gaiman would be an excellent example to study, since he covers a wide range of genres, and is considered one of the more literary comic book writers. Alan Moore is another. There are many, and it depends on your style.

Anyway, I hope this helps someone :)

Also, I am also interested in the relationship between visuals and words. I'm a huge comic book fan, and I have always been fascinated by the way it could turn a battle into a ballet.

I read recently that illustration was accepted in the medieval middle east, while painting was not - the idea was that, without a story to reference from, an image would become an idol. I wonder what those old scholars would think of heroes like Superman, or of comic books in general.

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